NIS 75th Anniversary

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National Institute of Science founders - Dr. Hubert B. Crouch of Kentucky State University and Dr. Thomas W. Turner of Hampton University - shared the same concern that African American scientists and researchers lacked a forum to discuss their own research and academic achievement, with fellow colleagues and peers. This was a time when many black scientists played significant roles in major governmental scientific research programs such as the Manhattan Project; the Synthetic Rubber Program; the Radar/Microwave Program; and the American Red Cross Blood Donor Project to name just a few.

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Dr. Crouch and Dr. Turner firmly believed that the scientific capabilities of students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities could be channeled to advance the futures of minority scientists and African Americans in general.

Since its inception in 1943, the history of the National Institute of Science (NIS) continues to evolve and grow. Each year the association publishes a peer-reviewed scientific journal entitled, "Transactions - The National Institute of Science." The publication contains award-winning manuscripts and abstracts.

In the past half century, NIS has transformed from being an organization once excluded from the mainstream scientific community, to one that is highly regarded and respected. NIS remains a place for all students, representing a broad spectrum of diversity, to nurture their scientific thinking.

The National Institute of Science celebrates its 75th Anniversary along with the celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the Joint Annual Meeting with the Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society in March 2018. Beginning in 1999, the National Institute of Science was funded by a T36 conference grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences to conduct various aspects of the Joint Annual Meeting. Today, the NIS is funded by the National Science Foundation to continue the support of students attending and presenting their research results at the Joint Annual Meeting.